Why do we celebrate Navratri?

The nine-day festival of Navratri in Hindu religion is held in honor of the nine manifestations of Goddess Durga. Navratri literally means ‘nine nights’ and is celebrated differently in different parts of India by Hindus. But in all places the victory of good over evil is celebrated and Goddess Shakti is propitiated. Such adoration to Mother Goddess is unique to Hinduism. The festival also marks the arrival of winter season, a period when Nature undergoes several changes.

Navratri begins on the first day of the bright half of Ashvin or Ashwayuja (September-October). Navratri ends on the ninth day of Ashvin. The tenth day is celebrated as Dasara or Vijaya Dashami.

In Hindu mythology, Navratri celebrates the victory of Goddess Durga over Mahishasura, the buffalo-headed demon. She fought for nine days and nine nights before emerging victorious on the tenth day.
Goddess Shakti in the nine forms is worshipped during the period for knowledge, wealth, prosperity and auspiciousness. Knowingly or unknowingly during this period we also recognize the primordial source of energy (Shakti), which manifests in all living and nonliving.


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